Abstract Detail



Evolutionary Developmental Biology (Evo-Devo)

Doust, Andrew [1], Hu, Hao [2], Mauro-Herrera, Margarita [3], Hodge, John [2].

Analysis of flowering time in the C4 panicoid grass model, Setaria sheds new light on the role of the CONSTANS transcription factor in photoperiod response.

We are exploring the photoperiodic control of flowering time in the model C4 grass, Setaria viridis.  This panicoid C4 grass species, unlike maize and sorghum, has not undergone strong human-mediated selection for photoperiod insensitivity.  The effect of photoperiod (day: night cycle) on flowering time is still poorly understood, and the Setaria system, because of its small size, diploid genome, rapid cycling, origin in temperate latitudes, close relationship to maize and sorghum, sensitivity to photoperiod differences, and genetic and genomic tools, is ideal for understanding photoperiodic effects.  Mapping results in different photoperiod regimes suggest that two photoperiod systems are likely at work in Setaria, and we have discovered through analysis of a CONSTANS mutant that CONSTANS appears to only control short day flowering responses.  We have used RNA-seq and qPCR to study photoperiod responses in both wild and mutant backgrounds, and propose a modified flowering network that is closer to the rice than to the more closely related sorghum and maize models.  We are continuing our research into genes responsible for regulating flowering time in long day conditions.


1 - Oklahoma State University, Plant Biology, Ecology And Evolution, Physical Sciences Room 301, Stillwater, OK, 74078, United States
2 - Oklahoma State University, Plant Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, PS 301, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078, USA
3 - Oklahoma State University, Plant Biology, Ecology, and Evolution, PS 301, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK, 74078, US

Keywords:
flowering time
Setaria
Grass
CONSTANS
photoperiod.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number:
Abstract ID:956
Candidate for Awards:None


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