Abstract Detail



Pteridology

Moran, Robbin C. [1], Garisson Hanks, Judith [2], Sundue , Michael A [3].

Phylogenetic Relationships of Neotropical Lady Ferns (Athyriaceae), with a Description of Ephemeropteris, Gen. Nov.

The lady ferns (Athyrium s.l.) are primarily distributed in the Old World, but include some New World representatives including Anisocampium, Pseudathyrium, and Athyrium s.s. Most of the New World species and especially those in the Neotropics,
have not been subject to phylogenetic investigation. Therefore, we carried out a molecular phylogenetic analysis of Neotropical lady ferns (based on five plastid markers) to investigate their relationships. We sampled Neotropical species of
Athyrium s.s. and Anisocampium and combined them with a comprehensive Athyriaceae dataset. Our analyses recovered a clade comprised of three Neotropical species sister to all other lady ferns, including Anisocampium skinneri along with two species thought to be related to it, A. palmense and A. tejeroi. Our results also indicate
that the other Neotropical species of Athyrium s.s. are not monophyletic. One of our seven samples belongs to the A. filix-femina clade (sect. Athyrium) which they have always been assumed to be related to, but the remaining six samples are resolved in sect. Mackinnoniana, which is otherwise comprised of Asian species. To accommodate our findings, we describe the A. skinneri clade as a new genus, Ephemeropteris, which comprises three species, These species occur primarily on the Pacific side
of Mesoamerica, a region with a highly seasonal climate. Based on month-of-collection data from herbarium specimens, leaf production is shown to be strongly seasonal in E. palmensis and E. skinneri.


1 - The New York Botanical Garden
2 - Marymount College
3 - The Pringle Herbarium, 111 Jeffords Hall, 63 Carrigan Dr., Burlington, VT, 05405, United States

Keywords:
Beringia
Eupolypods II
Boreotropics.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number: 0007
Abstract ID:211
Candidate for Awards:None


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