Abstract Detail



Anatomy and Morphology

Nolan, Katie [1], Bocklund, Kylie [1], Lan, Tianying [2], Tomlin, Crystal [2], Michael, Todd [3], Albert, Victor [2], Renner, Tanya [1].

Comparative morphology of the dimorphic leaf glands in carnivorous butterworts (Pinguicula L.).

In angiosperms, plant carnivory is one of the most unique adaptations to limited nutrient availability. With highly modified leaves, carnivorous plants are capable of attracting, trapping and digesting prey to supplement nutrients not readily available in the environment. The family Lentibulariaceae (Lamiales) is exclusively carnivorous and includes the genus Pinguicula(butterworts) that is sister to two remaining genera, Genlisea (corkscrew plants) and Utricularia (bladderworts). My research seeks to establish Pinguicula as a model system for understanding the evolution of carnivory in the Lentibulariaceae, given the ease to grow the genus in culture and for the simplicity of its trapping system – a basic flypaper trap based on sticky glands. An investigation of the dimorphic glands found on the surface of the carnivorous leaves of four Pinguiculaspecies will be presented, along with recent advancements in transcriptome and high-quality Oxford Nanopore genome sequencing for the genus. Morphological studies will help to illuminate the structure and function of the glands and also lend character states useful for resolving the Pinguiculaphylogeny.Gene expression studies combined with genome sequencing will help to elucidate the diversity of gene families important for carnivory in Pinguicula.


1 - The Pennsylvania State University, Entomology, 501 ASI Building , University Park, PA, 16802
2 - University at Buffalo, Biological Sciences, 109 Cooke Hall, Buffalo, NY, 14260
3 - J. Craig Venter Institute, 4120 Capricorn Lane, La Jolla, CA, 92037

Keywords:
Pinguicula
Lentibulariaceae
carnivorous plant
morphology
genomics.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number: 0005
Abstract ID:432
Candidate for Awards:Katherine Esau Award,Maynard F. Moseley Award


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