Abstract Detail



Population Genetics/Genomics

Zlonis, Katharine [1], Gross, Briana [2].

Population structure and gene flow at the southern edge of a species range: A case study in Primula mistassinica (Primulaceae).

Primula mistassinica is part of a suite of arctic species at the southern edge of their range in the upper midwestern US. In Minnesota, the vast majority of populations are found along the rocky shore of Lake Superior, where the deep, cold lake maintains an arctic microclimate. Climate change is predicted to degrade coastal habitat for arctic species like P. mistassinica as temperature increases and moisture decreases, altering the cold, damp microclimates these species depend on. Recently, we observed that southern coastal populations in Minnesota appear to produce fewer flowers than populations in Canada, where the species is more common. This suggests that southern coastal populations may already be declining in fitness, perhaps due to low genetic variation or inbreeding. Further, little is known about the genetic connectivity of coastal populations. In this project, we used sequenced-based genotyping to measure the genetic diversity, genetic structure, and degree of inbreeding for seven populations arrayed from south to north along the coast of Lake Superior. We found that southern populations showed roughly the same levels of genetic diversity as northern ones, indicating that these isolated populations are not suffering from an erosion of genetic diversity. Analysis of population structure revealed that most populations grouped with those that where geographically proximal, with evidence of gene flow between neighboring locations.  Results of this project provide critical information about the genetic diversity and connectivity of populations of a species that is restricted to a narrow microclimate.  


1 - 8337 30th St SE, Bemidji, MN, 56601, United States
2 - University Of Minnesota Duluth, Department Of Biology, 207 Swenson Science Building, 1035 Kirby Drive, Duluth, MN, 55812, United States

Keywords:
Primrose
relict
disjunct
gene flow.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number: 0012
Abstract ID:662
Candidate for Awards:None


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