Abstract Detail



Ecology

Givnish, Thomas [1], Kriebel, Ricardo [2], Zaborsky, John [2], Rose, Jeffrey P [3], Spalink, Daniel [4], Waller, Don [5], Cameron, Kenneth [6], Sytsma, Kenneth [7].

Phylogeny and trait evolution in the Wisconsin native and introduced angiosperm floras.

Wisconsin is home to 1582 native species of flowering plants, and 808 introduced species, including a total of 42 orders, 135 families, and 811 genera. Native species show strongly log-series distributions among both genera and families. To test a broad range of hypothesized trait x trait and trait x environmental relationships in Wisconsin angiosperms, we derived a molecular phylogeny including most native and introduced species of angiosperms based on >15K aligned DNA bases of plastid DNA (rbcL, matK, atpB, atpF-atpH, ndhF, rpl32, trnH-psbA), and then assembled data for ten parameters (life history, growth form, flower color, flower size, flowering under sunlit or shaded conditions, breeding system, mode of seed dispersal, and occurrence in closed, mixed, and open habitats). Using phylogenetically structured analyses, we tested for (1) significantly greater incidence among introduced species of annuals, herbs, open habitats, passively dispersed seeds, and small, white or inconspicuous, hermaphroditic flowers; (2) significant association of unisexuality with wind pollination or small, visually inconspicuous flowers; (3) significant associations of dioecy with fleshy fruits, woody habit, and wind pollination or small, visually inconspicuous, animal-pollinated flowers, alone or in combination; (4) significant association of monoecy with the combination of wind pollination and passively dispersed seeds; (5) significant association of small flowers and/or visually inconspicuous colors with flowering under closed canopies; (6) significant association of fleshy, animal-dispersed fruits with growth under closed or partly open canopies; and (7) significant association of dioecy with growth under closed or partly open canopies, via the preceding associations of floral size, floral color, and mode of seed dispersal with habitat.


1 - University Of Wisconsin-Madison, Department Of Botany, Birge Hall, 430 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, United States
2 - University of Wisconsin-Madison, Department of Botany, 430 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, United States
3 - University of Colorado-Boulder, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Boulder, CO, 80309, USA
4 - Texas A&M University, Ecosystem Science And Management, 2138 TAMU, College Station, TX, 77802, United States
5 - Univ. Of Wisconsin - Madison, Department Of Botany, 430 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, United States
6 - University Of Wisconsin, Department Of Botany, 154 Birge Hall, 450 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, United States
7 - University Of Wisconsin, Department Of Botany, Birge Hall, 430 Lincoln Drive, Madison, WI, 53706, United States

Keywords:
molecular phylogenetics
functional traits
native species
introduced species
life history
growth form
flower size
flower color
Breeding System
habitat
sun vs. shade.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number: 0010
Abstract ID:849
Candidate for Awards:None


Copyright © 2000-2019, Botanical Society of America. All rights reserved