Abstract Detail



Ecological factors that drive patterns of population genetic structure in plants

Nazareno , Alison Gonçalves [1], Dick, Christopher [2], Lohmann, Lucia [3].

Testing the Wallace’s Riverine Barrier Hypothesis for Amazonian plant species.

Wallace's Riverine Barrier hypothesis is one of the earliest biogeographic explanations for Amazon speciation, but it has rarely been tested in plants. We studied four Amazonian plant species, with different biological traits, to evaluate Wallace's Hypothesis using tools of landscape genomics. We generated unlinked single‐nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data from the nuclear genomes across 13 sampling sites along the Rio Negro and Rio Branco, Brazil, for Amphirrhox longifolia (Violaceae), Psychotria lupulina (Rubiaceae), Passiflora spinosa (Passifloriaceae) and Buchenavia oxycarpa (Combretaceae). Data relating to population structure support the hypothesis that the Rio Negro acted as a significant genetic barrier for A. longifolia and B. oxycarpa. Although significantly different migration rates were estimated between species, the population structure data do not support the hypothesis that the Rio Branco is a significant genetic barrier for Amphirrhox longifolia, Passiflora spinosa or Psychotria lupulina. Overall, we demonstrated that medium‐sized rivers in the Amazon Basin, such as the Rio Branco, are permeable barriers to gene flow for animal‐dispersed and animal‐pollinated plant species.


1 - Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Biologia Geral, Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil
2 - Ecology And Evolutionary Biology, 830 N University, 2019 Natural Science, Ann Arbor, MI, 48109, United States
3 - Universidade De Sao Paulo, Insituto De Biociencias, Departamento De Botanica, Rua Do Matao, 277, Sao Paulo, SP, 05508-090, Brazil

Keywords:
population differentiation
double digest RADseq 
single‐nucleotide polymorphism 
Rio Negro
Rio Branco.

Presentation Type: Colloquium Presentations
Number: 0006
Abstract ID:103
Candidate for Awards:Margaret Menzel Award


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