Abstract Detail



Education and Outreach

Uno, Gordon [1].

Using High-Impact Practices to Broaden STEM Student Access and Success.

High-Impact Practices (from AAC&U’s Liberal Education and America’s Promise project) are different activities, courses, or experiences in which students participate over extended periods of time.  Successful participation in HIPs has been demonstrated to increase retention and graduation rates for students, especially for historically disadvantaged students.  Participation also leads to more positive attitudes about college, faculty, learning in general, and about students themselves.  Students find relevance of what they are studying, and HIPs promote greater engagement in deep learning and greater self-reported gains in learning compared to traditional classroom experiences.  HIPs are being implemented by institutions around the country to resolve problems related to student success because they provide opportunities for engagement with and empathy for students as individual learners, which is the basis for equity instruction and inclusive learning.  HIPs also help improve students’ life and career skills, as well as the skills of the discipline.  The eleven identified HIPs are:  first-year seminars and experiences, common intellectual experiences, learning communities, writing intensive courses, collaborative assignments and projects, undergraduate research, diversity/global learning, service learning, internships, capstone courses, and ePortfolios.  For each HIP, there are essential features that matter and that improve chances for success.  This presentation will outline the HIPs, identify the keys to their use and to improved equity instruction, and will illustrate how institutions and departments can incorporate HIPs into programs and implement them successfully.  While HIPs are effective in many different disciplines, programs, and situations, implications of HIPs for STEM will be discussed, with ideas for incorporating them throughout a science curriculum.      


1 - University Of Oklahoma, Department Of Botany And Microbiology, Norman, OK, 73019, United States

Keywords:
High-Impact Practices
STEM Education
Equity Instruction.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number: 0004
Abstract ID:328
Candidate for Awards:None


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