Abstract Detail



Functional Genetics/Genomics

Landis, Jacob [1], Nguyen, Jessica [2], Villamor, Imma [3], Guercio, Angelica [4], Fiscus, Christopher [5], Quigley, Michelle [6], Ophelders, Tim [7], Eithun, Mitchell [7], Munch, Elizabeth [8], Chitwood, Dan [6], Koenig , Daniel [9].

Integrating next-generation high resolution phenotype acquisition with genotypes to study adaptation in barley (Hordeum vulgare).

With a changing climate and ever-increasing global population, being able to predict successful genotypes in an agricultural setting is becoming increasingly important. Understanding the genetic basis of crop performance over many years is imperative, but long-term studies translating genotype to phenotype are exceedingly rare. One such system, the composite cross II (CCII) of barley (Hordeum vulgare) is a near century long agricultural genetics experiment which allows us to explore the genetic basis of crop performance. The CCII was initiated in 1927 from 28 lines of cultivated barley from around the world and grown at UC Davis spanning 60 generations with no artificial selection. In two separate experiments spanning 40 generations of CCII, we used next-generation phenotyping methods to link genotype to phenotype in search of the genetic basis of success in this population. First, since spike development is both an agronomically important trait and a major component of fitness, using X-ray CT-scanning we tested the hypothesis of a reduction in spike morphology variance over generations. Previous results showed a reduction in genetic diversity and a reduction in morphological variation between early and late generations of CCII. Secondly, using an automated phenotyping platform at the Leibniz Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant Research (IPK) (Gatersleben, Germany), we tested the association between seedling morphology and growth patterns over 8 weeks to genomic signatures of long-term success in the CCII population. Using morphological/shape analysis of the X-ray CT data and time series developmental phenotype data, genome wide association was used to identify regions of the genome associated with fine-scale changes in spike morphology and differences in growth. These approaches will help further our understanding of the morphological changes that have occurred via adaptation spanning 40 generations.


1 - University of California, Riverside, Botany and Plant Sciences, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA
2 - University of California Riverside, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA, 92521, United States
3 - University of California Riverside, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, 900 University Ave, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA
4 - University of California Davis
5 - University Of California, Riverside , Department Of Botany And Plant Sciences , 900 University Avenue, Batchelor Hall , Riverside, CA, 92521, United States
6 - Michigan State University, Dept of Horticulture
7 - Michigan State University, Dept of Computational Mathematics
8 - Michigan State University, Dept of Computational Mathematics, Science & Engineering
9 - University of California Riverside, Department of Botany and Plant Sciences, Riverside, CA, 92521, USA

Keywords:
CT-scanning
SNP
adaptation
GWAS
barley.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number: 0008
Abstract ID:365
Candidate for Awards:Margaret Menzel Award


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