Abstract Detail



Bryology and Lichenology

Allen, Jessica [1], Hoffman, Jordan [2], Howe, Natalie [3], Dorey, Jenna [4], Lendemer, James [5].

The recovery and current status of lichens in New York City.

The growth of dense urban areas, and corresponding drastic decrease in air quality, led to the historical decline and loss of lichens in cities worldwide. The correlation between degree of urbanization and lichen diversity and abundance was clearly documented beginning in the 1800s, and in some cities lichenswere completely extirpated. Recently, in cities where air quality has improved, the return of lichens is now evident, and a growing body of literature on urban lichen biodiversity exists. The loss and subsequent recolonization of lichens was well-documented in New York City. Reports from John Torrey and Abraham Halsey document the occurrence of a vast diversity of lichens within the boundaries of New York City in the early 1800s. By the early 1900s George C. Wood documented some decline in diversity. Yet by the 1960s Irwin Brodo documented a near total absence. Our recent surveys from throughout the five Boroughs have uncovered a remarkable return of lichen diversity. There are currently over 100 species reported from within the city limits. Some exceptional finds include the discovery of 17 species at Freshkills Park in Staten Island, a capped and restored landfill, and the first Usnea in almost 200 years. Despite the recolonization of New York City by a surprising number of species, many species that were originally documented in the area have not returned. Our current, thorough snapshot of lichen diversity in New York will serve as a baseline for future studies as the urban lichen community continues to change in the coming century.


1 - Eastern Washington University, Biology, 258 Science Building, Cheney, Washington, 99004, United States
2 - The New York Botanical Garden, 2900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, NY, 10458, United States
3 - United States Department of Agriculture, Washington D.C.
4 - 2900 Southern Blvd., Bronx, NY, 10458, United States
5 - The New York Botanical Garden, Institute Of Systematic Botany, 200th Street And Southern Blvd, Bronx, NY, 10458, United States

Keywords:
Urban Ecology.

Presentation Type: Oral Paper
Number:
Abstract ID:597
Candidate for Awards:None


Copyright © 2000-2019, Botanical Society of America. All rights reserved